08 March 2010

PFW AW10 show report: Stella McCartney

This morning’s Stella McCartney A/W 2010 show was held in the incredibly grand setting of Paris’ Opera House with its frescoed ceilings, whopping great chandeliers and more gilt than you can shake a stick at.  In stark contrast, Stella showed her most pared-down, simple collection in seasons.

As the first girl appeared  in a sharply tailored jacket and trousers,  it was clear that this would be a departure from the colour and prettiness we have come to associate with Stella (the first signs of this new mood could be seen at her the pre fall 2010 collection, which also had simplicity as its core message).  But heartland Stella fans shouldn’t fear, this collection will still appeal to them, as  McCartney  nailed what the modern woman wants to wear right now - luxurious, beautifully-cut clothes that don’t vie with their wearer for attention, yet are not too ’classic’ or bland and have a subtle sex appeal.

But it was the details that elevated the collection to must-have status; double-faced cashmere coats had notched lapels; the deep cuff on simple, slim pants looked really modern; shift dresses had organza panels at the arm hole which gave the impression that the sleeve floated; silk cocktail dresses that appeared ultra-simple from the front were draped and open at the back (flashing your back is hot hot hot for autumn/winter).

With this collection - which she dedicated to her family and her friend Lee McQueen - Stella proved that she is still has the knack of knowing what women want to wear, even before they do.

What we loved:

* The mole-coloured sleeveless coat-dress worn by Lara Stone.
* The camel and black hoop-striped tunic worn with cigarette pants.
* The grey notched lapel tailored coat.
* The matt sequined short dress with organza over-lay.
* The parkas - honey coloured or in off-white and black panelling

- Siobhan Mallen in Paris


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