Lady Geek Chic: 5 New Ways Technology Is Driving Fashion Forward

21 February 2013

Lady Geek Chic: 5 New Ways Tech Is Driving Fashion Forward

We've just enjoyed another London Fashion Week and the whole thing was live-streamed, tweeted and blogged to oblivion, showing how the tech-couture relationship has never been stronger. Gadget gurus Lady Geek list five other ways that new technology is changing the face of fashion.

1. Turning Dresses into Movie Screens


If you saw the clips from this year's Grammy Awards, you’ll have seen tech and fashion joining forces to stunning effect. Carrie Underwood’s incredible Projection Dress drew gasps during her performance of ‘Blown Away’. The bespoke, platinum satin gown by Theia looked incredible enough as she took to the stage, but when it sprang  to life during the song - displaying a series of ever-changing, breathtaking animated images - jaws hit the floor.  Sadly Underwood had to stand stock-still in order for the projections to work properly, so unless you plan on being rooted to the spot all night it’ll be a little while before you can rock this look at a party.


2. Offering The Front Row Fashion Experience

2. Offering The Front Row Fashion Experience

One of the downsides of fashion shows is that, when it comes to the new designs, you only get the long-range effect.  The models are usually too far away to check out the incredible details that only reveal themselves up close (that’s if you’re lucky enough to be there, which, let’s be honest, most of us aren’t.) Designer Matthew Williamson combatted this during LFW using new bite-size video service Vine to give his social media audience the 'front row experience'. As each new creation hit the runway, a six-second Vine clip launched on Twitter, giving us tantalising glimpses of every gorgeous inch.

3. Giving us the Model’s POV



Google’s new Project Glass is developing a set of sci-fi specs that beams info in front of your eyes, giving you a view of  the world that’s a bit like the Terminator’s. The glasses also have the ability to work as cameras, a feature used to stunning effect by ace designer Diane von Furstenberg. Last season, Von Furstenberg gave her models Google glasses in the run up to New York Fashion Week, letting them record their every moment as they prepared for the big show. The resulting film turned the tables on who was watching who: suddenly fashionistas had an amazing insight into the experiences of being a model during a major show, and what it looked like to have the eyes of the world upon you as you strut down the catwalk. Clearly inspired, Topshop also teamed up with Google to do something similar in London this week.

4. Making Accessories Smart

4. Making Accessories Smart

If rumours are to be believed, this year's must-have accessory will come not from the halls of Prada or Chanel, but from Apple, who are supposedly developing a brand new 'smart' watch - inevitably being referred to as the iWatch. No-one is quite sure what eye-popping features the watch will include, but its likely to boast voice control and futuristic, ‘bendy’ glass. It will take its place in the new wave of new ‘wearable technology’, which already includes the super-stylish Pebble (out now), another watch that connects to your smartphone via bluetooth.    

5. Creating handbags that charge your phone, as well as hold it

 Solar-powered handbag by Diffus

We all love our gadgets, but they can be a pain - no more so than when they run low on battery in a crisis. Thankfully fashion designers are coming to the rescue, developing a host of amazing designs that employ a variety of energy sources to keep your phone or tablet charged through the day. Our favourite is the Solar-powered handbag by Diffus. Super-stylish and super-handy.

Lady Geek Chic: 5 New Ways Tech Is Driving Fashion Forward



@belindaparmar is the CEO of @ladygeek and the author of Little Miss Geek.  Little Miss Geek is available on amazon.co.uk


Comments

All posts must obey the house rules, if you object to any comments please let us know and we'll take the appropriate action.