Is Lady Gaga's Do What You Want With My Body Video The Most Controversial Music Promo Ever?

20 June 2014 by

Last night, a clip leaked online of the previously unseen video for Lady Gaga's Do What You Want With My Body - the single she released last year, featuring R Kelly. The video never saw the light of day, which Gaga blamed on time constraints and bad management.

But rumours of other reasons have persisted, mainly that it was just too controversial. Why so? Well R Kelly - who starred in the video as well as duetting on the song - was at the time in the press for his allegedly inappropriate relationships with young girls (A Village Voice piece chronicled a series of sexual assault cases against R Kelly in the 1990s).

If that wasn't enough, the video was directed by fashion photographer Terry Richardson - also swathed in scandal due to a string of allegations from models who say he has behaved inapprorpiately on shoots - including claims he co-erced them into sexual acts (he has refuted these allegations).

No-one knew what was actually in the video though - until now, as TMZ have got their hands on a 30-second clip. It is - from what we've seen - pretty shady stuff. R Kelly - who appears to play a doctor treating Gaga - reaches under the sheets and touches her while she moans. He says "sounds like that medicine is starting to kick in," before she passes out.

In other scenes, Terry Richardson makes a cameo - a common occurance in his work - and snaps Gaga writhing around naked in a pile of newspaper. According to Page Six, the video also has R Kelly  saying to Gaga "I'm putting you under, and when you wake up you're going to be pregnant." Which, correct us if we're wrong, sounds a bit like rape.

TMZ.com obtained a clip of the canned video

It's hard to tell what Gaga's intentions for the video were without seeing the whole thing, but from this clip we're glad this never saw the light of day - and in hindsight she probably is too. A source told Page Six: “Gaga had a video directed by an alleged sexual predator, starring another sexual predator. With the theme, ‘I’m going to do whatever I want with your body’? It was literally an ad for rape.”

Of course, Gaga isn't the first pop star to cause controversy with her music videos. Madonna was doing it 25 years ago with Like A Prayer - although for different reasons - and Gaga always like to cause a reaction (remember she got an artist to vomit on her at SXSW festival this year?). But there's a difference between ruffling a few feathers and being massively offensive - and it looks like this time even she thought she'd gone too far. We think its best for everyone if she sticks to wearing meat dresses in future.

Meanwhile, here's five other videos that - while perhaps not quite in the same league as Gaga's - also caused a bit of a furore for various other reasons...

1. Madonna - Like A Prayer

When it was released in 1989 this was condemned by the Vatican - who took offence to Madonna's use of Christian imagery and they perceived as blasphemy - and resulted in her losing her contract with Pepsi.

2. Miley Cyrus -Wrecking Ball

The teen pop starlet writhes naked on a swinging ball. Uproar ensues, and the You Tube views keep on rising (over 600 million to date) Like Gaga's canned video, this was directed by Terry Richardson.

3. Robin Thicke - Blurred Lines ft. T.I, Pharrell

Three ladies strut around naked while thick Robin Thicke tells them that they "want it" and that he has a big package, and Pharrell chews some straw. Bleurgh.

4. Britney Spears - Baby One More Time

It seems positively tame by today's standards - but a 16-year-old Britney dancing provocatively while dressed in school uniform caused outrage when it was released.

5. Rihanna - Pour It Out

In which the semi-naked singer writhes around in a thong and diamante bra as a bunch of pole dancers gyrate in the water surrounding her. It was banned 10 minutes after first appearing on YouTube.


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