25 October 2010

Does this Calvin Klein ad deserve to be banned ?

 

Do you think this Calvin Klein advert deserved to be banned in Australia?
The country’s advertising standards bureau have demanded it’s stripped from billboards. Its ‘suggestive of rape’ they say – emancipates women and gives men a bad name.  
They issued the following statement explaining their blackout:
‘The Board considered that whilst the act depicted could be consensual, the overall impact and most likely takeout is that the scene is suggestive of violence and rape. The image is demeaning to women by suggesting that she is a plaything of these men. It also demeans men by implying sexualised violence against women.’
And though – some may say – it’s no more controversial then Klein’s past campaigns (it all started with gymslip Brooke Shields in the eighties) psychologists have backed the ban.
Clinical psychologist Alison Grundy, who specialises in treating victims of sexual abuse, said the image ‘clearly intimates’ the gang rape of a women.
‘If we continue to subject future generations of young men to great barrages of aggressive, misogynist, over-sexualised and violent imagery in pornography, movies, computer games and advertising, we will continue to see the rates of sexual violence against women and children that continue unabated today. Or worse.’
Do you think this is an overreaction and men should be given more credit: we hope it’d take more then a poster to create a generation of sex offenders.
Or did the ad bureau make the right call?
Over to you…
 
By Amy Molloy

 

So, as we mentioned on Friday, Australia's advertising standards bureau has demanded Calvin Klein's new ad campaign is stripped from the country's billboards, after claiming the images are "suggestive of rape", and demeaning to women and men.  

The bureau has now issued the following statement explaining their blackout: "The Board considered that whilst the act depicted could be consensual, the overall impact and most likely takeout is that the scene is suggestive of violence and rape. The image is demeaning to women by suggesting that she is a plaything of these men. It also demeans men by implying sexualised violence against women."

Of course, Calvin Klein is known for its controversial headline-grabbing campaigns, (starting with that Brooke Shields jeans ad in the Eighties), but this campaign has prompted psychologists to back the ban.

Clinical psychologist Alison Grundy, who specialises in treating victims of sexual abuse, said the image ‘clearly intimates’ the gang rape of a women; ‘if we continue to subject future generations of young men to great barrages of aggressive, misogynist, over-sexualised and violent imagery in pornography, movies, computer games and advertising, we will continue to see the rates of sexual violence against women and children that continue unabated today. Or worse.’

Do you think this is an overreaction and men should be given more credit? We hope it’d take more then a poster to create a generation of sex offenders.

Or did the ad bureau make the right call?

Over to you…

- Amy Molloy


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