Top Hollywood Casting Agent Bans Fake Breasts

22 March 2010

Cap'n Jack is looking for an on-set deck hand… but those with breast-enlargements need not apply.

A casting call spec for the latest instalment of Pirates of the Caribbean, circulated around Los Angeles agents last week, couldn’t have been more specific:

‘Seeking beautiful female fit models. Must be 5ft 7in-8in, size 4 or 6, no bigger or smaller. Age 18-25. Must have real breasts.’

Is the director concerned breast implants may be a health and safety issue when it comes to stunts (the casting call also specifies the actresses must be able to swim and dive)?

Or, are they concerned an extra with a FF chest might overshadow the star of the film Keira Knightly, who by her own admission is ‘not well endowed,’ to the point that in King Arthur ‘they literally painted in my cleavage’ – and controversially airbrushed the film’s promo posters, doubling her cup size with one click of the mouse.

We can understand them not wanting Jordan on deck, but some boob-jobbers opt for the natural look, don’t they?

‘Woman used to want the most bang for their buck’, said Renato Saltz, the president of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ‘Now I see many opting instead for a C-cup over a traditional double D cup because they want something more subtle.  

A former casting director himself, Renato says it’s not just false breast directors avoid. ‘Director such as Martin Scorsese already avoid employing actresses using Botox or with collagen inflated lips,’ he said. ‘They know what they want which is to avoid vulgar distractions. In Hollywood movies, where everything else is false, nothing is more valued than natural beauty.’

Do you think banning busty buccaneers counts as employment discrimination? Or do you see the casting director’s point that false breasts have no place in films, unless they’re X-rated? Let us know below!

By Amy Molloy


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